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Relatives of Sergio Hernández sit in Ciudad Juarez at the U.S.-Mexico border, on the second anniversary of his killing in 2012. Jesus Alcazar/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Orders Hearing on Fatal Border Shooting of Mexican Teenager

The Supreme Court set aside an appeals court decision involving the fatal border shooting of a Mexican national by a U.S. Border Patrol agent, sending the case back down for further proceedings on possible violations of constitutional rights and whether the agent is personally liable to pay money to the Mexican citizen’s family.

Bartletti, Don –– – MARCH 19, 2009. RODEO, NEW MEXICO. Veteran U.S. Border Patrol tracker Rogelio Villa and other agents move smugglers through the desert. The marijuana backpack on his ATV has blue shoulder straps fashioned from blankets. Villa and his team tracked the suspects for 6 hours before surrounding …

Family Argues Mexican National Killed by Border Patrol Had Constitutional Rights

A Mexican family whose son was killed by a U.S. Border Patrol agent told the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday that the agent violated their son’s constitutional rights by using unnecessary deadly force. A preliminary issue is whether the Constitution applies to someone who is not a citizen of the U.S. and was standing on Mexican soil at the time of the shooting.

Hernandez Shooting AP

Supreme Court Hears Case on Fatal Border Shooting

How a U.S. Border Patrol argent’s use of lethal force at the U.S-Mexican border implicates constitutional rights and foreign affairs dominated arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday in Hernandez v. Mesa. The lawyer arguing that the agent should be held liable had a rough day in front of the justices.

KVII Screenshot from Israel Leija Police Chase

Sotomayor Chastises SCOTUS for ‘Shoot First, Think Later’ Ruling in Texas Police Case

The Supreme Court of the United States issued a per curium decision today reversing a 2014 U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit opinion holding that a Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) trooper was not entitled to be granted qualified immunity. The officer had used deadly force to stop a driver in a high-speed car chase. Justice Sotomayor chastised the court for allowing a “shoot first, think later approach to policing.”