Free Trade

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands with China's President Xi Jinping on the sidelines of a summit last month, as ties between the world's second and third largest economies gradually thaw

Japan’s Abe and China’s Xi Agree to Strengthen Ties

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe met with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Beijing on Friday and agreed to strengthen bilateral relations. “We confirmed that we are cooperative partners and absolutely do not pose a threat to each other,” Abe said after the meeting.

Japan's Shinzo Abe and China's Xi Jinping have met numerous times over the last few years on the sidelines of international events but no Japanese leader has made an official visit to China since 2011

Japanese PM Shinzo Abe Plans Visit to China

Chinese officials announced on Friday that Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will visit China from October 25 – 27, in concert with the 40th anniversary of the “Treaty of Peace and Friendship” signed by the two nations.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will be in the hot seat when he testifies before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on July 25, 2018 about President Donald Trump's closed-door summit with his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin

Pompeo: ‘Free and Open Trade’ with America Is Better than China’s Debt Imperialism

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told the Indo-Pacific Business Forum on Monday that business engagement and “free and open” trade are major elements of the Trump administration’s strategic vision for the region. Although he mentioned China only in passing, Secretary Pompeo’s remarks included a clear warning to regional powers about the perils of partnering with Beijing.

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Chadwick Moore — Left for Dead in Danville: How Globalism Is Killing Working Class America

The story of Danville is one echoed in countless communities across the country, a gutted middle class left for dead in the wake of sweeping international trade deals in Washington, applauded by liberal economists and a lockstep media portraying such policies as inevitable, ultimately good, and a win for the American consumer–a narrative usually coupled with condescending and disdainful attitudes toward displaced workers for a perceived inability to sprint ahead with the times.