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State Department Names Former Fox News Anchor as Spokeswoman

WASHINGTON (AP) — The State Department says former Fox News Channel anchor Heather Nauert will be the agency’s new spokeswoman. The department says Nauert will fill the slot that had been vacant since the start of the Trump administration. The

FLYNN: A Tale of Three Bills

“Through failure, we learn a lesson in humility which is probably needed, painful though it is,” informed Bill W. The co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous offers a lesson to three other Bills periodically in the news for the wrong reasons.

5 Border Horrors Establishment Media Mostly Ignore

The brutality that comes from the open border between the U.S. and Mexico is often unreported or never brought up again after an initial report by news outlets in both countries — Mexican journalists often lose their lives for such reporting; U.S. journalists simply avoid such reports for political reasons. Even in the cases where establishment media have covered the horrors, they do not include the previous reports in current news or discussions about border issues.

Poll: 96% of Trump Supporters Would Vote for Him Again, Win Popular Vote

An ABC News/Washington Post poll released on Sunday found that President Donald Trump only had 42% approval from Americans, the lowest since 1945 — but that 96% of Trump supporters say that they would vote for him again. Moreover, the poll indicates that Trump could win the popular vote if the 2016 electorate were to vote a second time.

AP Photo

Thousands Brave L.A. Heat Wave to ‘March for Science’

It was 85 degrees in downtown Los Angeles on Saturday, but thousands skipped a trip to the beach or the mountains and instead dragged themselves along a mile-long route to listen to a few celebrity pseudo-scientists and activists to drone on about climate change.

Pinkerton: Before Trump Nation, There Was Fox Nation: Fox News After Roger Ailes and Bill O’Reilly

An era has come to an end at Fox News. The departure, last year, of Roger Ailes, its founder and CEO for two decades, and the departure, this year, of Bill O’Reilly, its biggest star for two decades, means that Fox will be changing. What’s said of politics is also true of TV: Personnel is policy. Tell me the names of those who are making the decisions about programming, and the names of those who are actually doing the shows, and I’ll tell you, in turn, about the network. But first, let’s take a closer look at the country—at least its presidential voting patterns—pre-Fox and post-Fox.