preferred pronouns

Wikipedia Admins Support Banning Editors for Not Using ‘Preferred Pronouns’

A long-time Wikipedia editor for over a decade, Guy Macon, retired from the site late June after he was briefly banned for not using “preferred pronouns” when discussing a ban appeal by former site administrator Ashley Van Haeften. Macon used Van Haeften’s username “Fæ” instead of singular “they” due to grammatical objections. Van Haeften and Macon previously fought over the former’s agenda-driven editing. Though the ban was lifted on grounds Macon was sincerely trying to respect Van Haeften’s wishes, some administrators still argued it was valid, citing the “code of conduct” recently imposed by Wikipedia’s owners.

gender

Wikipedia Editor Temporarily Banned for Criticizing Use of ‘Tree’ as Pronoun

The Wikipedia page for actor Keiynan Lonsdale became a battlefield in the fight over “preferred pronouns” due to a Twitter thread noting Lonsdale once suggested “tree” as his preferred pronoun. Despite doubts about Lonsdale’s sincerity, editors repeatedly changed the male pronouns on his article to “tree” this past week until an editor sought a compromise by removing pronouns entirely. One editor who criticized the move and denigrated the idea of “tree” as a pronoun was banned for a week.

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Elizabeth Warren Adds ‘Preferred Pronouns’ to Twitter Bio

Presidential candidate and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) recently edited her official campaign Twitter bio to specify her “preferred pronouns” as part of an apparent attempt to appeal to younger, more “woke” voters who view gender as a social construct.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., waves to the audience before taking questions during a presidential forum held by She The People on the Texas State University campus Wednesday, April 24, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)