Tag: rust belt

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Virgil — The Two Americas: One America Grows and Profits, the Other Shrinks and Dies

The headline in the November 19 Wall Street Journal put the matter plainly: There are “Two Americas.” One America that gains from globalization, and another much larger America that loses from globalization. And as we now know, this cleaving of the nation is not just a matter of economics, it’s also a matter of life and death.

Ronna Romney McDaniel Getty

Exclusive — RNC Chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel on 2018: ‘We’re Not Going to Concede Anything’

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Republican National Committee (RNC) chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel told Breitbart News in an exclusive interview last week in her office on Capitol Hill that Republicans are preparing already for what they expect may be a landslide midterm electoral victory that sweeps in as many as 14 GOP pickups in the U.S. Senate and not only holds but strengthens the House GOP majority.

Early microchip (Keystone / Getty)

End of Microchip Revolution Very Bad News for Wages

Geopolitical Futures’ annual forecast predicts the maturation of the microchip-based productivity cycle means that the economic challenges facing America’s middle- and lower-class “can’t be solved.”

AP Photo

The Farmer’s Plight Part 3: Bad Trade Deals and Worse Actors

A historic agriculture crisis requires debt acceleration, price drops and misguided federal policy. When it comes to naming misguided policy, it doesn’t take farmers long — especially cotton farmers — to cite “that damned Brazil deal.”

Cotton-based panty liners of the Organyc brand were found to contain tiny amounts of pesticide

The Farmer’s Plight Part 2: Rural America’s Nightmare–Again

The growing and unprecedented crisis with U.S. cotton is indicative of the plight of all sectors in American production agriculture. More and more, on the turn rows of western and southern Texas, they grasp for a historical crisis by which to gauge cotton’s present situation in which the industry’s fundamentals are stressed. “The early ‘80s” is often muttered, but quickly dismissed, mainly because interest rates aren’t soaring as they were 35 years ago.