Supreme Court Rules for Federal Agents in 9/11 Lawsuits

The Supreme Court on Monday ruled on lawsuits involving the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks that have been running since then, ruling mostly in favor of the federal agents sued for their actions following the attacks, but remanding one issue back to the lower courts for another hearing.

jihad

Key Facts for Gorsuch Confirmation Fight

WASHINGTON—As senators prepare to vote on the confirmation of Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court, the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday highlighted several key facts to the public to inform the nationwide discussion as the Senate increasingly appears headed to a historic outcome one way or the other.

gorsuch

Supreme Court: Pennsylvania Chief Justice Cannot Rule on Death Penalty Case

In a 5-3 split decision, last Thursday the Supreme Court held that Chief Justice Ronald Castille of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court cannot be part of deciding a convict’s case because 30 years ago he was one of the prosecutors involved with the original prosecution, creating an “impermissible risk” of bias that would violate due process.

AP Photo/Dave Martin

Trump’s SCOTUS List Gives America Clear Choice

WASHINGTON—Presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump took a big step toward rallying GOP conservatives around his candidacy with his list of potential Supreme Court picks, a who’s-who list of legal conservatives which draws a sharp contrast to Hillary Clinton and the Democrats.

The Associated Press

Clarence Thomas: Faith, Patriotism, and the Constitution at Hillsdale

Last week, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas delivered the 2016 commencement speech at Hillsdale College — the highly respected liberal arts school famed for its adherence to conservative principles — garnering national attention as he declared, “Much that seemed inconceivable is now firmly or universally established.”

AP Photo/Tribune Review, Sidney Davis

Supreme Court: City Violated Cop’s Free-Speech Rights

Last week, the Supreme Court held that when the government mistakenly believes a person is exercising his free-speech rights, yet that person is, in fact, not exercising any rights at all, it still violates the First Amendment to punish that person for what officials thought he was doing. The Court’s conservative justices disagree.

The U.S. Supreme Court is seen in Washington, Monday, March 7, 2011. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Texas Attorney General Wins Another 90 Days at SCOTUS for Voter-ID Law

WASHINGTON—On April 29, the Supreme Court issued an unusual order denying the relief requested by challengers to Texas’s voter-ID law, but also sending a signal to the appeals court currently examining the law, informing the lower court that it only has until July 20 to make a final decision, so that the Supreme Court would have time to act if necessary before the 2016 election.

Ken Paxton Texas Attorney General